[Salman Rushdie] Photo by Rachel Eliza Griffith
Photo by Rachel Eliza Griffith

Salman Rushdie

in Conversation with Joe Donahue of WAMC
Presented in association with Oblong Books & Music
 

“A brilliant, funny, world-encompassing wonder.” —Time

Called a “dazzling Don Quixote for the modern age,” the internationally bestselling author masterfully uses a classic text to shed light on modern trials in his just-released Quichotte, now a finalist for the 2019 Booker Prize.

Inspired by the Cervantes classic, Sam DuChamp, mediocre writer of spy thrillers, creates Quichotte, a courtly, addled salesman obsessed with television, who falls in impossible love with a TV star. Together with his (imaginary) son Sancho, Quichotte sets off on a picaresque quest across America to prove worthy of her hand, gallantly braving the tragicomic perils of an age where “Anything-Can-Happen.” Meanwhile, his creator, in a midlife crisis, has equally urgent challenges of his own.

Just as Cervantes wrote Don Quixote to satirize the culture of his time, Rushdie takes the reader on a wild ride through a country on the verge of moral and spiritual collapse. And with the kind of storytelling magic that is the hallmark of his work, the fully realized lives of Duchamp and Quichotte intertwine in a profoundly human quest for love and a wickedly entertaining portrait of an age in which fact is so often indiscernible from fiction.

Estimated run time: 80 minutes